BY JAN HAAG

INTRODUCTION + POETRY + ESSAYS + MUSIC + TRAVEL + FICTION + TEXTILE ART

HAAG'S BIO

ART & POETRY - ACCUMULATIONS



E-MAIL RE: SALMON SOULS



Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2003 11:28:21
From: Burke Membership
To: burkemem@u.washington.edu Subject: Great Native American lecture at the Burke this week!

10-30-03 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Maryann Barron 206-543-9762, maryannb@u.washington.edu

Journeys of the Soul in Northwest Coast Native Cultures

Slide Presentation at the Burke Museum, Thurs., Nov. 6 6:30 pm


Seattle - How do we ensure that there will be enough souls to go around generation after generation?

Northwest Coast Natives for centuries have had their own unique answer to this question: Salmon shared souls with Native Americans, and ensuring their well-being was key to the supply of human souls. Learn more about how people shared the same soul pool with the "salmon people" on Thurs. Nov. 6 in a slide presentation by Burke Museum Director, Dr. George MacDonald. The lecture, entitled, "Pathways to Heaven: Journeys of the Soul in Northwest Coast Native Culture" is free to the public.

Held in conjunction with the Burke's current exhibit: Reverent Remembrance: Honoring the Dead, this lecture touches on how native cultures along the Northwest Coast honored their deceased elders and ancestors. MacDonald will illustrate these historical beliefs through numerous examples of artwork created by 19th and early 20th century Native Americans. The idea of shared souls is a common concept among Native American cultures. However, the idea that salmon are a "people" and that they specifically share souls from the same pool as do people, is unique to this region. Their annual arrival to the rivers and streams of the Northwest was celebrated and honored each year; guaranteeing a supply of food, and if properly honored, of souls for future generations. .

Dr. MacDonald is the director of the Burke Museum, with over 35 years experience studying the art and culture of native groups of the Pacific Northwest . Prior to coming to the Burke, he was director of the Canadian Museum of Civilization, and more recently of the Museums of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia. He has a Ph.D in Anthropology from Yale University.

The Burke Museum is located at the corner of NE 45th St and 17th Ave NE, on the University of Washington campus. Hours are 10 am to 5 pm daily and until 8 pm on the first Thursday of each month. Admission is $6.50 general, $5 seniors, $3 students/youth. The museum is FREE to children 5 and under, Burke members, UW students, faculty, and staff. Admission is free to the public on the first Thursday of each month. For more information, please call 206-543-5590 or visit www.burkemuseum.org.

Copyright © 2003 Burke Museum





Copyright © 2004 Jan Haag
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Jan Haag may be reached via e-mail: jhaag@janhaag.com or jhaag@u.washington.edu

COPPER RIVER SALMON



INDEX for THE 2003 POEMS


BY JAN HAAG

ART & POETRY - ACCUMULATIONS

INTRODUCTION + POETRY + MUSIC + ESSAYS + TRAVEL + FICTION + TEXTILE ART

HAAG'S BIO

21st CENTURY ART, C.E. - B.C., A Context